Jewish sex

Judaism includes a wide corpus of texts, practices, theological positions, and forms of organization.

Within Judaism there are a variety of movements, most of which emerged from Rabbinic Judaism, which holds that God revealed his laws and commandments to Moses on Mount Sinai in the form of both the Written and Oral Torah.

In places, it discusses sexual behavior in plain and frank terms. In Jewish law, sex is not considered shameful, sinful or obscene.

Sex is not thought of as a necessary evil for the sole purpose of procreation.

Following is a partial list of Hebrew, Yiddish and other Jewish terms used on this web site. I have attempted to provide pronunciations for most of these terms.

Some of the pronunciations may not be strictly, technically correct, but they are the way I usually hear the terms pronounced.

Although sexual desire comes from the yetzer ra (the evil impulse), it is no more evil than hunger or thirst, which also come from the yetzer ra.

Like hunger, thirst or other basic instincts, sexual desire must be controlled and channeled, satisfied at the proper time, place and manner.

the experience of diaspora life, from the Ancient Egyptian rule over the Levant, to Assyrian Captivity and Exile, to Babylonian Captivity and Exile, to Seleucid Imperial rule, to the Roman occupation and Exile, and the historical relations between Jews and their homeland thereafter, became a major feature of Jewish history, identity and memory.

Historically, this assertion was challenged by various groups such as the Sadducees and Hellenistic Judaism during the Second Temple period; the Karaites and Sabbateans during the early and later medieval period; Today, the largest Jewish religious movements are Orthodox Judaism (Haredi Judaism and Modern Orthodox Judaism), Conservative Judaism and Reform Judaism.

Major sources of difference between these groups are their approaches to Jewish law, the authority of the Rabbinic tradition, and the significance of the State of Israel.

According to the Hebrew Bible, the name of both the tribe and kingdom derive from Judah, the fourth son of Jacob.‎, Yidn (pl.).

Note: This page addresses issues of Jewish law that may not be appropriate for younger readers.

Unfortunately, what I usually hear is a mix of Ashkenazic and Sephardic pronunciations.

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